Lesson 6 describing plot answers

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We welcome your feedback, comments and questions about this site or page. Please submit your feedback or enquiries via our Feedback page. Lesson 6 Summary In this lesson, you developed a method to define the center of a data distribution.

The reason it is called the fair share value is that if all the subjects were to have the same data value, it would be the mean value. The arithmetic operation of division divides a total into equal parts. Lesson 6 Classwork Example 1 Recall that in Lesson 3, Robert, a 6th grader at Roosevelt Middle School, investigated the number of hours of sleep sixth grade students get on school nights.

Today, he is to make a short report to the class on his investigation. Here is his report. I did this by drawing a dot plot. Part of our lessons last week was to identify what we thought was a centering point of the data, the spread of the data, and the shape of the data. So, for my data, looking at the dot plot, I would say that the typical number of hours sixth- grade students sleep get when they have school the next day is around or because that is what most students said and the values are kind of in the middle.

I also noticed that the data were spread out from the center by about three or four hours in both directions. The shape of the distribution is kind of like a mound. She liked his report but has a really different thought about determining the center of the number of hours of sleep.

Her idea is to even out the data in order to determine a typical or center value. Exercises 1—6 Suppose that Michelle asks ten of her classmates for the number of hours they usually sleep when there is school the next day. Suppose they responded in hours : 8 10 8 8 11 11 9 8 10 7 1. How do you think Robert would organize his data?

What do you think Robert would say is the center of these ten data points? Why or why not? She finds the total number of hours of sleep for each of the ten students.

That is 90 hours. She has 90 Unifix cubes Snap cubes. She gives each of the ten students the number of cubes that equals the number of hours of sleep each had reported. She then asks each of the ten students to connect their cubes in a stack and put their stacks on a table to compare them. She then has them share their cubes with each other until they all have the same number of cubes in their stacks when they are done sharing.

Work in a group. Each group of students gets 90 cubes.To get started, I gave the students a quick pre-assessment on the elements of the plot. We graded it quickly in class before we started. My plan was to differentiate and have students who already knew the material skip the notes on plot. Several of my students were able to answer all the questions with accuracy, so I pulled those students out and had them work on an alternative activity which was reading a well known text, "Little Red Riding Hood" and identifying the elements of the plot.

I ended up pulling my them back with the rest of my class and having them work with the whole group. I think the main problem was that my pretest didn't show understanding of the concept as much as it did rote memorization.

So, for the rest of the time, I didn't pull a small group, but just used the students who did well as volunteers and leaders. The scoop on the pre-assessment. I begin this lesson by modeling to get the students started because the majority of them did not know all of the elements of the plot and did not score in the proficient range on my pretest. My 8 year old introduced me to this website which is a collection of children's books read by famous people. As the students listen to the story, I will have them make a flow map of the events of the story.

I will pause the story periodically to let them catch up on the events. I have the luxury of having a smart board and speakers in my classroom, but if you don't this activity could work with any story that has a simple and predictable plot.

The teacher could always read a story aloud too. I just liked this version because this particular story teller uses great expression, and watching a video is always engaging for my kiddos. They listen to me talk all day, so they welcome the change! After all of the introductory information is given, I will pause the video to allow students to jot it down. I'll pause again after the next couple events were introduced, and I continued through out the story.

I will introduce the exposition and have students label their own plot diagram. Then we will discuss what information from Enemy Pie belongs in the exposition. The students will write this on the diagram in their notebooks.

We will repeat this process with the rising action, climax, falling action, and resolution. I know that the climax is the most difficult part for students to identify, so I plan on spending some extra time explaining it. I like to teach the students to identify the climax by asking, "What is the part you've been waiting for?

The students are able to take the information directly from the flow map and apply it to their plot diagram. I have them flow map it first to make sure that they don't leave anything out to prepare them for more difficult text in the future. This was a really bad planning day! I planned this lesson on Friday after school, and I was in a hurry to leave.

Grade 8 Mathematics

It showed today! After my first class, I had to completely re order what I did, and it ended up working much better. My lessons always go better with more student centered lessons and less direct instruction.

Once I took myself out of the lesson, all was well! We will be applying this information to tomorrow, so to close out I will have them answer this question on a post it. This will be their ticket out the door today, and they will stick the post it on the door as they leave. We will begin our day discussing their answers tomorrow. I like to have students reflect on their learning in small ways like this to get them thinking critically about what they have learned that day.

If it is posted up on the door, it is easy to start the next class by revisiting the closure from the previous day. It's a good way to job their memories and get them thinking again. Empty Layer. Home Professional Learning.Looking for video lessons that will help you in your Common Core Grade 6 math classwork or homework?

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lesson 6 describing plot answers

We welcome your feedback, comments and questions about this site or page. Please submit your feedback or enquiries via our Feedback page. The Lesson Plans and Worksheets are divided into six modules. You can use the free Mathway calculator and problem solver below to practice Algebra or other math topics. Try the given examples, or type in your own problem and check your answer with the step-by-step explanations.

Mid-Module Assessment Topics A through B assessment 1 day, return 1 day, remediation or further applications 2 days. End-of-Module Assessment Topics A through C assessment 1 day, return 1 day, remediation or further applications 2 days. End-Module Assessment Topics A through C assessment 1 day, return 1 day, remediation or further applications 2 days. End-Module Assessment Topics C through E assessment 1 day, return 1 day, remediation or further applications 2 days. End-Module Assessment Topics A through D assessment 1 day, return 1 day, remediation or further applications 2 days.Give students some interesting facts about presidents and their ages at inauguration.

Ask students if it is possible for a president to be 40 years old at their inauguration? It is possible, the constitution requires the president to be at least 35 years old SMP 1 and 2. How old do they think a president should be? Allow time to let students think about their responses.

This would be a good round robin share see video SMP 3. The students will be using a chart with information about the US presidents.

lesson 6 describing plot answers

They will be specifically looking at the ages of the presidents during their inauguration. Ask the students why it is necessary to put this information into a table? Are most of the presidents between 50 and 54 years old at the time of inauguration? This will get the students to realize that there may be a better way to analyze this data then sifting through all of the numbers.

Next, ask the students if a line plot would be a good way to represent this data? Instruct students that they will be creating a line plot to represent the data.

Give them grid paper and the chart to use to assist them in their data representation. The students will wrap up the lesson by working on the Line Plot skills worksheet Pearson. This worksheet will work on analyzing line plots as addressed in 6. Empty Layer. Home Professional Learning. Professional Learning. Learn more about.

Sign Up Log In. What does it mean? Analyzing and Creating Stem and Leaf Plots. Line Plot Activity Add to Favorites 11 teachers like this lesson. The students will be connecting math to social studies in this activity about the ages of the presidents during their inauguration. Big Idea This lesson will tap into US History and the ages of presidents during their inauguration and describing the data in a line plot.

Lesson Author. Grade Level. MP1 Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them. MP2 Reason abstractly and quantitatively.

MP3 Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others. MP4 Model with mathematics. MP6 Attend to precision. DO NOW 10 minutes. It is possible, the constitution requires the president to be at least 35 years old SMP 1 and 2 How old do they think a president should be?

Analyzing and Creating Line Plots 60 minutes. This will get the students to realize that there may be a better way to analyze this data then sifting through all of the numbers Next, ask the students if a line plot would be a good way to represent this data?

SMP 4 and 6. Previous Lesson.Try one of these search tips: Check your spelling. Try fewer or different key words. Try using filters. Select one of the recommendations above. Save your faves and access them any time in My File Cabinet. Try our Category Index for quick navigation to all our resources. Monthly Packs: Everything you need to teach each month!

Sign in Register. Sign In. Having trouble signing in? Advanced filters. Grade Range. Genre : Select. Price Range. Guided Reading : Select. Lexile : Select. Accelerated Reader : Select. DRA : Select. Age Range. Language : Select. Publication Date : Select. Dewey Decimal : Select. Plot, Character, and Setting.

Recognizing plot, character, and setting is essential to comprehension of literary texts.Print This Page. See more like this.

Common Core Grade 6 Math (Worksheets, Homework, Lesson Plans)

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Find the latest in professional publications, learn new techniques and strategies, and find out how you can connect with other literacy professionals. Patricia Schulze. Review the reflective journal entries that students write in response to the Reflective Journal Instructions to gauge their understanding of plot structures during Session Two. Ideally, review these entries before Session Three so that you can identify any concepts that need more exploration. Assess the final essay students compose using the Writing Rubric.

Focus your attention on evidence that students understand the difference between summarizing the story and its analyzing plot. Additionally ensure that students understand the key literary terms introduced during the lesson exposition, rising action, climax, falling action, resolution. All rights reserved. Teacher Resources by Grade. Your students can save their work with Student Interactives. View together the "Jack and the Beanstalk" Plot Diagram.

Record each of the elements using the Plot Diaram Interactive Tool. While this may seem elementary, fairy tales are frequently used at the secondary level to help students more easily see plot structure.

Students can also work in small groups in the computer lab. If Internet access is limited, the teacher can read aloud the tale, students can brainstorm events, and the class can diagram the plot on the board or on paper.

As a class, read "The Flowers" by Alice Walker or short story of choice. Ask students to brainstorm the significant events in the story. As students make suggestions, write the events on the board. When students finish making suggestions, review the list. Ask students to look for any items which have been omitted or items which should be combined. Discuss the difference between significant events and the other events in the story. Remind students of the information from the Elements of Plot PowerPoint Presentationparticularly the connections between the plot and the conflict in the story.

Display the Reader's Guide to Understanding Plot Development and work as a group to structure the events into the specific plot structures. As a class, arrange the events of the plot, using the Plot Diagram student interactive, and discussing the literary terms of exposition, rising action, climax, falling action, and resolution. Answer any questions that students have regarding the elements. Divide students into groups of three each.Download Worksheets for Grade 8, Module 6, Lesson 7.

Rotate to landscape screen format on a mobile phone or small tablet to use the Mathway widget, a free math problem solver that answers your questions with step-by-step explanations. We welcome your feedback, comments and questions about this site or page. Please submit your feedback or enquiries via our Feedback page.

A negative linear relationship is one that would be modeled by a line with a negative slope. Lesson 7 Classwork EExample 1 In the previous lesson, you learned that when data is collected on two numerical variables, a good place to start is to look at a scatter plot of the data. When you look at a scatter plot, you should ask yourself the following questions: 1. Does it look like there is a relationship between the two variables used to make the scatter plot?

If there is a relationship, does it appear to be linear? If the relationship appears to be linear, is the relationship a positive linear relationship or a negative linear relationship? To answer the first question, look for patterns in the scatter plot.

Does there appear to be a general pattern to the points in the scatter plot, or do the points look as if they are scattered at random?

If you see a pattern, you can answer the second question by thinking about whether the pattern would be well-described by a line. Answering the third question requires you to distinguish between a positive linear relationship and a negative linear relationship. A positive linear relationship is one that is described by a line with a positive slope. A negative linear relationship is one that is described by a line with a negative slope.

You can use the free Mathway calculator and problem solver below to practice Algebra or other math topics.

lesson 6 describing plot answers

Try the given examples, or type in your own problem and check your answer with the step-by-step explanations.


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